Drama, Theatre and Film – Micia

Drama, Theatre and Film – Micia De Wet

The world of theatre and film has for the most part been undervalued and underappreciated in South Africa, especially when compared with the European culture of the industry.

I then came across Micia, and asked her if she would be willing to share her passion for arts and culture with us.

How did your interest in drama and stage productions come about?

When I was nine I knew what I wanted to do, and it was all about the rush and adrenaline of being on stage, and that is what I started with.  As I became older it became the idea of being able to tell people’s stories for people who can’t tell their stories themselves.

Now it has moved into a strong socio-political avenue, as I feel like that it is a huge responsibility for any performer of creator person, to invest in open and explore. I think that is my biggest thing with drama and film and any mode of storytelling.

Do you through your line of work see a lot of stage productions?

Yes, I this year traveled to Prague for instance where I performed in their International Theater Festival. Yes, I see a fair amount of movies and stage plays. More movies than stage plays because of availability. There are French festivals everywhere and I feel that is where you see the majority of the work that people today should be seeing.

Why are independent films in South Africa not such a big thing?

Getting independent films to be part of the South African culture is the hardest part. The whole way we approach all of it, in essence, our thinking has to change, and that is what makes it so difficult.

Funding is also a challenge as you only get funding when they know it is going to be a commercial success. The various funders also didn’t want to fund our trip to Prague, until only afterwards when we proved to be successful, they started showing interest.

There is some truth in the fact that most funders are more lenient to give funding for recycled stories which they know will work, causing a lot of work not to be original.

Do you think the promotion of arts and culture in South Africa can be done?

On promoting and changing the South African culture for the better, I believe that there is always that possibility for people as a collective to change, and I love the notion of non-violent, non-disruptive change, where you can see something in a different way without being forced to see it in a different way.

Globally we are going through a stage where everything is to violent, to find that change, to find that breach of going forward. There is also currently a whole lot more freedom of speech but no responsibility toward what is being said.

That is what I try to advocate for, is to take responsibility for what you say. A lot of times I’ve seen stuff that felt like a lot of anger and thoughts of emotion just being spewed out and in film as well, and you think to yourself, you have to interrogate that, you have to think about that on a broader context, you can’t just put your feelings out there when they are not rationalized.

What are your goals forward?

Regarding drama am I focusing on theatre at the moment, but I have film and movie making as a goal and am pursuing it.

Do you have any film Directors you aspire to?

One of my favorite people is the Austrian film director and screen writer Michael Haneke, but I’m also fond of Danish Director Lars von Trier, known for the film Dogville with Nicole Kidman, which is a very abstract and strange film.  I love the way Lars deals with visual mediums, where it is almost a shock and a brutal and animalistic way in which he deals with imagery but it works so well in his way of storytelling.

What is it about film that motivates you?

There is the script but movies are more about the cinematography and the putting together of the images and that is what excites me about film.

It is important to be loving what you are doing, because when you love what you do, people can see that, and that is what they walk away with.

 

Article by:  Johannes A Snyman  Photography by : Aniki Grobbelaar / Chapters by Ani  Location: Tashas – Menlyn Maine

THE SARTORIALIST

THE SARTORIALIST

Bloggers want to be him. New Yorkers adore him. And photo journalists has been copying his techniques for goodness-know, how many years now.
The very special, (and may I add,) very creative man behind the camera in the streets of, well most major hubs in the world, is fervently leading the way in the world of fashion photo journalism.
His name is Scott Schuman and he is The Sartorialist.

Becoming one of the world’s renowned photographers, one can imagine a lot of hard work, inspiration and ambition needed but he admits himself when he says, “Each day I feel like I can take the best picture of my life…” and stresses the importance of a good morning routine, so that once, you “hit the door, then you can forget about yourself and do the job, because you feel good…”

Scott started his blog back in 2005, photographing what have been described as ‘real people.’ And have been loving it ever since, with his blog and social media following going through the roof.

Scott also states that part of dreams he wants to fulfill is to get better at what he is doing. In his own words does he want to capitalize on all the different things that he is good at, writing better, shooting better, and communicating better.

Below a truly inspiring documentary, THE SARTORIALIST directed by Tyler Manson.

 

From Dubai

FROM DUBAI

Amazing stories from South Africans in Dubai keep making the rounds, and so we ventured to have a chat with L’re van Rooyen.

For the last year or so, L’re has ardently been working in a royalty of palaces in the United Arab Emirates, attending to the ‘pets’ of the nobles, otherwise referred to as a private zoo.

Long hours and high demands kept her on her toes, while ensuring that she enjoyed every precious moment of free time she has with us here in South Africa over the December holidays.

Now for the odd bit.

She has a perfect modern, state of the art smart phone. Only it has no camera, nor any other ability to take photos. Naturally for security reasons, photos are prohibited in her work space, and so required of her to purchase something very few of us even new existed. Apparently only a couple of smart phones like these exist, and upon googling it, I found a Blackberry and something else, but not the one I saw in her hand.

Oh yes, one other thing. She also happens to be an excellent swimmer.

Unfortunately we didn’t get around to the swimming pool, but there is always a next time.

She’ll be traveling all around South Africa, in the days to come, with even Swaziland on her list of locations.

Not at all your average hunting meat

Riga Merchants are merchants of name. We pride ourselves in the quality of every single product coming from our platforms.

 

That is why we do not purchase any meat that has been hunted during the South African hunting season, nor do we except any meat from game ranchers who offers a couple of animals which were in excess and needed to be culled for the purposes of game ranch management.

Our meat comes only from registered, export and internationally approved game abattoirs, who continues to supply some of the top markets in the world.

It is of utmost importance to understand this, as a large part of the South African public perception about game meat (venison,) originates from what we experienced because of a culture of hunting.

In most cases, the hunt takes place during the day, and with this, there are usually some hunting related action involved. This causes adrenaline rushes among other natural biochemical reactions in the animal, especially if it was not a head shot, which have a dramatic effect on the quality, tenderness and taste of the meat. There are, apart from that, very rarely any consistency with the processing of the meat, as various factors plays a role in the correct way of bleeding the animal, and the effectiveness of getting it to the slaughtering facility.

The game meat from Riga merchant is professionally harvested by a team of registered harvesters, using suppressors on their rifles, placing head-shots and frequently working at night, so as to cause minimum suffering to the animals with absolutely no damage to the meat itself.

The processing is done in a similar fashion where quality can be maintained by very effective transport of the carcasses, at just the right temperature and readiness of staff at the abattoir and processing facilities.

This, among many other factors, insures us to be able to supply to you, some of the best products South Africa has to offer.

With a very quick, deliciously pan-fried sirloin steak, why not give it a try and fall in love with a premium source of nutrition, natural in every sense, the healthy game meat option for everyone.

Major health benefits of South African Game meat.

Most of us are aware of the low fat content of game meat and the natural benefits organic meat hold for our bodies, but there are a few other benefits triumphing the mainstream meat products we find on our shelves currently.

To start with, Game meat in general has lower Omega-6 fatty acids, which, according to Linus Pauling Institute in Oregon, USA, can cause higher inflammation in the body. On the other hand, game meat boasts with a higher amount of Omega-3 fatty acids, which in effect can lower the risk of heart disease as well as a vigorous curb on stiffness and joint pain.

With up to 30% richer in protein, coupled with some iron and zinc benefits, which we will have a look at in a later blog post, the paybacks on eating game just keeps adding up.

There is however a crucial determining factor when standing in front of the fridge or freezer at the local retailer and having to make a decision on the overwhelmingly round chicken, or the lean game.

Your taste buds in relation to your imagination has a great impact on whether you opt for the more socially excepted, or for the health factor, both presented equally tasty on display. Well, this is where the great news comes in. It does not take long to cook up a proper meal with great taste, when quickly want to fix something for dinner. Time is of the essence for most professional people, and cooking takes up much of the precious moments that could have been spent with the family. With game meat however, a couple of minutes is all you need.

Quick and easy, in the pan. You really can’t go wrong.